"No to excess, no to overdone nudity; no to the obvious and commonplace, no to sensationalism"—these words are Giorgio Armani's creative response to the realities of life post 9/11.

Armani's vision has always been about melding the utilitarian practicality of menswear with the softening influence of innovative fabric as evidenced in his first sequence of gray herringbone and Prince of Wales jackets shown with fluid pants. The soft-but-strong structure of an Armani jacket is a design landmark, and he emphasized it throughout cutting neatly fitting shapes with slightly pointed shoulders. Bellboy looks, short spencers and strap-fastened jackets were all teamed with voluminous pants, and many outfits were accessorized with the designer's new bags (the best was a large, dark brown leather boxy oblong style with handles). Through over eighty looks, Armani experimented with variations on the trouser theme from harem pants to knickers to pleat-fronted styles. He even pushed the design of the baggiest pants so that they appeared as a kind of skirt caught into stirrups near floor-level.

For evening, Armani sparkled via bugle-beaded bustiers, cutaway sequin dresses over pants and—the shining standout—a silver beaded jacket with a matching flower in the lapel.