Andrew Harmon has won himself a loyal following for his tailoring, which was the unsurprising focus of the tightly edited (16-outfit) fall collection he showed for men and women. There was a surprise, however, in the reappearance of Rudolf Nureyev's phantom on the catwalk. What started as a head-scratcher in Milan (there have been no exhibitions or documentaries or dance revivals to kick-start new interest in the late Russian dancer) has developed into a fully fledged trend.

In Harmon's case, the interest in Nureyev's style came about in a confluence of his love of all things Russian and his passion for the seventies (born in 1976, he conveniently missed the realities of that decade). So the first outfit featured an intarsia cashmere sweater with a constructivist pattern, worn under a shearling bomber with a distinct military influence. That same influence was evident in epauletted shirts and officer's coats (for both men and women). Dungarees and Cossack-ish collarless shirts suggested Rudi (with a lot of help from styling touches like caps and huge bow ties), though there was a more generic seventies feel to full, pleated trousers, a midnight-blue velvet suit, and, for women, a brown silk military shirt belted over jeans.