Wolfgang Joop's Fall Wunderkind collection was inspired by Suprematism, the early-twentieth-century Russian abstract art movement founded by Kazimir Malevich, as well as by the work of contemporary German artist Gregor Törzs. The results are a strong argument that art is often better left on walls. Malevich's rectangle and square paintings became the basis for a colorful geometric print that appeared on chiffon dresses. Worn with matching tights or sequined leggings stitched in the same graphic pattern, the frocks were quite an eyeful. Törzs' depictions of cheetahs and deer, meanwhile, were printed onto wool coats, which detracted from the garments rather than elevating them. In fact, the strongest looks in the collection were the first ones to hit the runway. These showed Joop's prowess as a tailor, and, with their padded hips and on-trend forties power shoulders, suggested he does possess the ability to design relevant clothes.