The setup for John Patrick's Organic presentation fell into place when he settled on his venue, the lower level of a Garment District church. "I thought, 'What happens in church basements? Bake sales!' " he said. Against one wall, a group of farmers from Patrick's upstate hometown offered attendees local cheese samples, seed packets, and literature on the benefits of sustainable practices.

If Spring's girl had an Okie spirit, her Fall counterpart is a strong, modern twenty-first-century woman. There were scuba-inspired body-con minis and a sleeveless trenchdress made from a recycled polyester treated to look like beaver fur. If that sounds like a departure, it still felt "100 Percent Organic." The clothes had charm, and the focus remained centered on the company's ethical practices: the use of sustainable materials and the team of cottage-industry workers Patrick employs in Peru. Designers frequently offer clothing with no real relevancy to the world we inhabit. It's refreshing to see someone approach their work as part of a greater whole.