Peter Pilotto and his subtle, colorful prints and form-flattering drape are the talk of London, and not just because people are beginning to drop his name. All week, women—buyers, editors, creative directors—wearing pieces of his Spring collection have been bumping into one another at dinners, parties, and up and down front rows. Pilotto is selling like mad, and no one minds: His appreciators are just very happy to watch a talent come forward, and support it.

Pilotto is one of those whose thoughts have turned, this season, to the massive, fundamental events of natural history (maybe because it shrinks our current human anxieties to a minuscule blip). He and his partner, Christopher De Vos, an ex-Vivienne Westwood designer, say they've been working around "the awe and wonder of the big bang theory, an optimistic new beginning." Pilotto developed the prints and textures (stripes derived from digital manipulation of photos of fur and reptile skin), built up silk tufted tops tipped with paint to mimic "an erupting volcano," and created chunky embroidery from geometric plastic paillettes. De Vos, whose responsibility is shape, worked out variations on the internal-draping tricks he's made his signature, and oversaw the development of the hourglass camel coat that was the best piece of tailoring on their runway. This will doubtless be the season when Pilotto and De Vos (who met at Antwerp's Royal Academy of Fine Arts in 2000) break through from the early adopters to a more mainstream crowd.