At Threeasfour's presentation-cum-performance piece at Greene Naftali Gallery, models pruned bonsai trees perched on oblique pedestals to the atmospheric sounds of the Icelandic singer Kría Brekkan. The scene came to Adi Gil, one-third of the design triumvirate, in a dream. It was off the wall to be sure, but the scene wasn't a total disconnect from the clothes. Instead of their familiar curvilinear constructions, Threeasfour worked with the geometric shapes of crystals. Straight cuts replaced circular ones, and sheer silks were matched with opaque wools. Completing the metaphor, some of the looks were accented with Swarovski crystals neatly arrayed in squares or triangles. "We wanted to do something different," said Gil. "Something that felt honest to this time." The minimalist palette—half the looks were in black, and the others were in off-white—helped their game plan, as did the sharp, almost futuristic tailoring. Pants were spliced at the knee, and coats were layered together from planes of fabric in a manner that recalled armor. As for the dresses, they were a patchwork of polygons, stitched together at odd angles that created asymmetric necklines and handkerchief hems. It was interesting that the vocabulary changed, but the end results didn't. The collection was still signature Threeasfour—arty, intellectual, and anything but ordinary.