Albino D'Amato's collection was a focused if slightly repetitive study in shape. Make that two shapes—on the one hand, there were A-line, quasi-trapezoidal silhouettes; and on the other, there were sleek, pencil-slim sheaths. Necklines were high, almost prim. But if a general austerity ruled above the waist (not a button in sight, no superfluous details save for a few chaste black ribbon bows), a lot of action was going on below it. Those A-line dresses and capes came to a halt well above the knees, and his long dresses had slits that inched up the thighs.

Albino used just a few colors-—creamy white, caramel, brown, light blue, and black—all of which worked back to the photo-realistic stained-glass prints (again, the religious undertones) that appeared on stately silk mikados. The concise palette, along with the absence of pants, gave the show its aforementioned focus, but could be a bit unrelenting. Still, there were some compelling numbers in the mix. Among the shorter styles, a black cape lined in white neoprene stood up to all the other versions of this topper out there on the runways. As for the longer numbers, cable sweaters cropped an inch or so above narrow slit skirts looked right.