"It's space military," said Louise Goldin, of a collection whose launching pad was the photos of Pierre Cardin's graphic sixties work and body armor pinned to her studio wall. That puts Goldin in the futurist/sci-fi substream of current trend, though in her case, it's a development of the silhouette she's been working a while. For Fall, it took her into sculptural stiff-peplumed army green or navy tunics and A-line skirts with padded 3-D geometric surfaces, as well as matte-shine splicings of leather, stingray, and fox.

Technically, Goldin's a genius in knitwear—her quilting effects and origamilike structures are the result of months spent working in Italian factories, coaxing the near-impossible out of expert machinists for her showpieces. It's a pulled-together, rigorous look, and the flashes of styling genius (like the sparkly cuffed red or pink short shorts peeking from beneath hemlines) set it apart from anything too literally Trekkie. At this stage of her career, Goldin has nothing more to prove on the accomplishment or vision fronts. More mundanely, though, her struggle is to convince the audience that her total look can be broken down into items that will merge into an everyday wardrobe. Backstage, she pulled out regular sweaters with bullet holders and pockets on the upper arms, cargo leggings, and lace-fine geometrically patterned knitted hosiery—all liable to help her salability. But she still needs to bend her uncompromising talent to making those items more evident.