The inversions that climate change is causing in nature are grabbing attention in every other arena, so why should fashion be an exception? Todd Lynn's inspiration was twofold. The hunter captures and wears his prey, then the tables are turned: The hunter is captured and caged by the game. In other words: Nature finds a way to deal with man. It was an admirable and—in its own dark way—reassuring message, but it was somewhat obscured by Lynn's sinfully sumptuous materials. The hunter's prey was symbolized by fox furs from Saga, which the designer draped, shruglike, over a taupe leather jacket or a felted wool coat. The cages were a little easier to cope with. They were woven leather, exaggeratedly straddling the torso.

You'll notice that, in both instances, the emphasis was on the shoulder. Lynn went for a pagoda silhouette in his more "low-key" pieces, like the wool jacket with linebacker leather inserts, or the gray jersey jacket that also featured built-out leather shoulders. The combination of cloth and skin was a step forward in a softening of Lynn's usual hyper-tailored aesthetic. Another significant advance with this collection was the overall use of leather, braided into strikingly dramatic outerwear. Climate change or not, Lynn continues to cover a narrow waterfront, but he's mastered a balance between provocation and desirability. And, although they were separated in today's front row by his old boss Roland Mouret, we have him to thank for London fashion week's oddest (semi-)couple: Janet Jackson and Soft Cell's Marc Almond. Imagine the sweet but strange music they'd make together.