The groundbreaking thing about E. Tautz is that the label, founded in 1867 and steeped in the history of British tailoring, makes absolutely no attempt to be, well, groundbreaking.

"We like simple menswear," explained Patrick Grant, who revived the line in 2009 after acquiring the bespoke tailoring firm Norton & Sons, which owns it. "What you see are all simple pieces, made by hand in the U.K. I don't come from a fashion background, and it is essentially about clothes I want to wear." That philosophy is one which has chimed with many other men who want beautiful fashion, the kind not necessarily spelled with a capital F. (Though Grant has also had the foresight to lend the services of his bespoke tailors to designers who do work in capital-F style, such as Kim Jones and Henry Holland.)

The E. Tautz line may be simple, but it is also plenty luxurious. As Schubert was played on a grand piano, out came immaculately cut sportswear: suits and jackets in deep, saturated colors that took their cues from the landscape of the Scottish Highlands, in rich browns, mustards, oatmeals, and reds; dusty cashmeres, fine-wale cords, and beautiful herringbones rounded out the more casual options. "The clothing is all quite familiar," Grant said. "But nobody makes clothes like these to pass down to future generations anymore." A few generations down the line, in its worn and loved state, no doubt E. Tautz clothing will look even better. It's this sense of more permanent evolution rather than disposable revolution that Grant seems all set to achieve.