Add Holly Fulton to the list of young Londoners this week experimenting with that most classic of English fabrics, tweed. Her initial inspiration was Coco Chanel visiting Scotland with her beau, the Duke of Westminster. But the terrific thing about this city's designers is that they're so steeped in heritage, there's no need to fetishize and take it all so seriously.

Fulton opened with a bumblebee black-and-yellow tweed cut into a flippy skirt and a shift, both with swingy beaded trim; there was also a fur-hemmed coat worn with only a brassiere and spike-trimmed tuxedo pants. A windowpane camel skirt came in patent leather with spikes.

Partly, the show was an evolution of Fulton's unmistakable pop sensibility: brightly optimistic, sixties-silhouetted, Deco-detailed, and just plain decorated. But today she rendered some of it with a lighter hand—not every look was stacked to the gills with accessories, as has been the case in the past. A boxy white top worn with lip-print silk pants may have come with a white fur bag, a hat, and earrings, but it still had a pajamalike ease. (For a bit of the designer's wit, check out the coat with disembodied lips sipping from the tower of the Empire State building.) Fulton going simple might sound antithetical to what's made her stand out, especially since her jewelry has resonated in such an immediate way. But it's good to see a young talent shifting and testing how best to bring her vision to the world each season.