It pretty much goes without saying that Threeasfour like to do things their own way. Designers Adi, Ange, and Gabi have an eccentric vision, and they've earned the right, as inveterate and innovative fashion experimenters, to stage their shows however they please. Tonight, though, one couldn't help feeling they were being willfully obscurantist, to the detriment of their fine Fall collection. The show at Saatchi & Saatchi was dimly lit—almost totally dark, in fact—and as the models walked the looks, they were only illuminated in bursts and snatches. It was almost impossible to see the clothes.

What was easy enough to make out was this: Threeasfour had seized inspiration from music, in particular from stringed instruments, and the relationship between sound and form. The theme was explored in literal ways—accessories made from used violins, which will in fact be produced for sale—and via extrapolation. Notably, the collection featured a number of halterneck dresses fretted like harps, some embroidered in Spirograph-esque designs, others, in a silk-nylon blend, riffing on the construction of parachutes. The most inventive boasted ruffles of pleated horsehair snaking around their skirts like viscera.

Elsewhere, the looks felt familiar: curved, quilted coats and jackets, including an especially good collarless offering, done in panels of leather and neoprene; pieced leather pants and leggings; draped jumpsuits and dresses in a graphic wool suiting pinstripe. The latter looks were decidedly commercial—and in general, the collection was marked by its accessibility. In fact, it seemed fair to wonder whether the designers had decided to give their show so little light lest these clothes be seen for what they are: approachable.