The unemployment rate may be falling, but to judge from Steven Alan's presentation this morning, we're heading into a depression. Alan's Fall collections for both men and women riffed on thirties-era aesthetics, with an emphasis on worn tailoring and a gray and sepia-toned palette straight out of Dorothea Lange.

The cited inspiration was Diego Rivera—another icon of the up-with-labor, bread line era. Alan channeled the Rivera influence into newly emphasized handknits made in South America, as well as striped jackets and waistcoats redolent of Mexican blankets. For women, the blanket theme was extrapolated as well, into items like a mid-calf, contrast-striped jersey dress.

The menswear collection saw Alan continuing to develop his dressier pieces—there were soft tailored suits in a variety of interesting fabrications, such as moleskin and washed wool, and narrow trousers with a subtle slouch. Elsewhere, he turned out some nice adaptations of closet staples, such as a navy anorak in leather.

The women's collection, meanwhile, riffed on the men's. Many of the menswear materials repeated themselves, notably the herringbone tweed, while girlier items such as a pleated skort (skort!) and appealing full skirts were executed in mannish checks and foulard prints. Metallic brocade provided a nice counterpoint to the general low-key atmosphere. All in all, there were no real surprises here from Alan, but the collections had a strong, cohesive point of view and boasted lots of salable, easy-to-wear clothes.