Ralph Lauren might have played the series theme song, but it was L'Wren Scott whose show more closely evoked Downton Abbey. Citing England from the 1900's to WWII as reference, she called the collection Tea Time, though that didn't come close to conveying its high drama. There were lean velvet and satin gowns pinned with estate jewels for a proper dinner, and even a floor-sweeping black cape—the perfect thing for eloping with the chauffeur. A gold brocade cape came with a huge bow at the nape of the neck and was lushly lined in royal purple feathers.

The clothes seemed as rich as the lunch: a tin of Petrossian caviar served with a baked potato, chives, and crème fraîche. Just try to sneak past an Occupy Wall Street protester in a purple brocade jacket over a matching ponyskin skirt and fuchsia chiffon blouse trimmed with velvet bows. Scott explained that her fabrics were so expensive that she took it easy on her typically heavy embellishment.

It's worth noting that several seasons ago Scott's first lunch was held for a super-elite group of 30 people, while today's guests numbered around 120. (It's still a relatively tough ticket to score for those lucky enough to rub shoulders with Mick, Daphne, and co.) She's come a very long way from making a few fab body-hugging dresses and jeans that make your legs look a mile long; her range of offerings has grown along with the guest list. There were jeweled clutches to expand on the handbag line she launched last fall and a rainbow of cage sandals from her shoe line, not to mention loosened silhouettes like the printed tea dresses with swishing skirts. The trick now will be to maintain her distinct point of view. So far, so good.