The show began with an impossible proposition: Keep the descending swarms of showgoers off the uncovered runway. A human wall of volunteers and a man with a Swiffer did their valiant best, but more than one audience member's heel scuffed the catwalk before the lights went down. Why all the fuss? Who knows, but Acra presumably wanted a gleaming surface for her girls to walk on, an acceptable enough reason for a collection based on "feminine power." That phrase was Acra's, issued backstage, where she explained that she wanted to convey a sense of power through strong, second-skin silhouettes.

For day, Acra got her slinky message across with a strong-shouldered, nipped-waist leather jacket and matching pencil skirt in wine red. Snug, embellished skirt suits in metallic tweed and herringbone hewed close to the body. Another leather jacket had the contained volume of a puffer coat, but it cinched the waist, flared out to a peplum, and flaunted a high, protective collar—not a coat you'd want to mess with.

Some of the air was released from the silhouette for night. A few Deco-beaded flapper dresses slid by, welcome respites from all the hourglasses. But there was more skin to be seen, and three gowns featured major peekaboo cutouts that slashed the body with wide zigzags. The trompe l'oeil effect was more disturbing than delightful, and would likely pose problems for anyone with a décolletage. There was a red-carpet winner, however, in the show's closer: a one-shouldered silk crepe gown, taut across the bodice, that opened to a sheer, beaded skirt allowing for plenty of movement. Clothes that let you walk where you want sounds like feminine power to us.