Trussardi's program notes, not to mention the market stall packed with fresh fruits and vegetables at the end of the runway, promised a trip to the Peruvian countryside—straight up to the top of Machu Picchu. At another house, that might've meant all types of native dress, but under Umit Benan's new leadership, this Italian brand is becoming known for strong, sharp tailoring. Benan designed menswear first; his own evocative show is usually among the highlights of Milan's men's week.

As with his debut here last season, the focus was on structured but not strict jackets, collared shirts, and well-cut trousers with an ease about them. (A few of the suits were three-piecers.) The only obvious nods to the Andes came in the form of wide-brim hats with rounded crowns, and oversize backpacks in exotics, and to a lesser extent perhaps the asymmetric hem of skirts worn over pants. Benan can't help himself, he designs clothes suited for women who negotiate the wilds of modern cities. A coat in shearling and snakeskin was made to attract attention, not repel the elements, while shirtdresses in leather or silk had a relaxed sense of chic. In all, this felt like a solid follow-up to Benan's strong debut at Trussardi, but you sense that, if he really buckled down to the task, he could push things further here.