The emphasis that Hardy Amies places on "Made in England" rings true for a company whose namesake got to hang with crowned heads, even in those days when designers were considered hired help. But if English craftsmanship detailed the new collection—the handmade leather holdall, the silk jacquard weave of an evening jacket—creative director Claire Malcolm had her own fantasy. She imagined the strictness of the early twentieth-century Bauhaus design movement applied to classic English tailoring, with artists Josef and Anni Albers fronting up to Balmoral, the royal retreat in the Scottish Highlands where Amies himself would join the king and queen for a summer vacation in the thirties. It wasn't a particularly promising proposition, but it actually turned out to be a perfectly harmonious union. Bauhaus line-and-square blockiness loaned itself to a new tartan, as in a checked cape, or a matching coat and jacket. And when Malcolm applied the angular rigor of the Bauhaus to tailoring, she got the kind of streamlined, cropped suiting that might make lean young men feel like dressing up for the city. True, the boots and backpacks hinted at gentlemanly hikes in the Highlands, but Malcolm managed to dodge the bullet of deadly heritage. Her Amies was true.