Mark McNairy has tapped Woolrich's long history of hunting and military garb in the seasons he's been at the helm of Woolrich Woolen Mills. But recently he found himself at a vintage car show, appreciating the artifacts from what he called "the beginning of the American infatuation with an automobile." A lightbulb went off: Like Zelig, Woolrich had been there. McNairy set himself the task of imagining the WWM wardrobe as a kind of early-driver's uniform: slouchy tweeds with braces, mixed-media flat caps, a full Donegal suit. A few pieces headed in the honking direction of Toad of Toad Hall. But he wasn't, the designer cautioned, out to make costumes, and for the most part, he didn't, adapting where necessary: The blanket a top-down driver would've thrown over his shoulders became a blanket poncho, or a blanket peacoat. And where no adaptations were needed, he didn't adapt. His fabrics have always been drawn from the Woolrich archive, but he's always given each a tweak. For Fall, for the first time, they're repro'ed in facsimile.