Want to make a lovely dress? That's easy—buy a pattern. Want to make a dress that's interesting, or even (aiming higher now) engrossing? For that, you'll have to find new ideas, something that Brood's Serkan Sarier has proven he possesses during his six seasons on the scene. "Brood is always about pairing opposites," Sarier said at his Fall 2013 presentation. "The idea is merging two things that seem completely opposite into something that hopefully is harmonious." The opposites attracting fashionable eyes today were an eighteenth-century Provençal floral print and monochromatic circles culled from the work of op-art pioneer Victor Vasarely. It was as if Damien Hirst sent his assistants to work on one of William Morris' proper wallpaper florals, simultaneously debasing and energizing the traditional motif.

Sarier's hybrid print lent itself equally well to a stiff faille skirt with trapunto stitching at the hem as it did to a long, cowl-necked silk georgette dress. The most interesting pieces made use of couturelike techniques to create ballooning volumes. One look that resembled a corseted bodice and full, New Look skirt turned out to be a one-piece dress. Zippers, toggles, and drawstrings balanced the more formal elements and introduced a sharp sportiness throughout. A gray wool skirt, with inverted pleats in the print, and the coordinating tailored, print-lined hoodie looked like strong prospects to see mixed into plugged-in wardrobes soon.