"Mothers and daughters." Jeremy Laing often mentions these two women in conversation and how he aims to design for both of them. A Toronto-based scenester whose price point easily hits the upper-contemporary mark, Laing needs to appeal to women with a bit of money. And in most cases, that means mothers.

For Mom, there were plenty of art teacher-style pieces: smock tops and funnel necks abounded. A below-the-knee coat, done in a luxurious stuffed jacquard colored Joseph Beuys red, was sophisticated. So was a tweedy cropped jacket that Laing is calling "the Mogul."

For daughters, there were flashier, sexier styles, including separates in gold lamé seersucker. "It's dirty," said Laing of the metallic-preppy pairing. The ironic combo looked best in a motorcycle jacket and skinny trousers. That unofficial suit was shown with a georgette top in a black and white stripe-and-cross print, a collaboration with friend and artist Vanessa Maltese. Maltese, who is also based in Toronto, had a hand in the large metal necklaces too. They looked cool, but for the most part they were too big—a detraction from the great clothes.

In general, though, it's hard not to think that Laing deserves more credit than he is afforded. (Showing at New York fashion week since Spring 2006, he is no longer the shiny new toy.) With clothes that work for mothers and daughters alike, more should take notice.