It's Lacoste's 80th anniversary this year, and the booklet of images that awaited guests at today's show detailed a timeline of innovative creativity. Remarkable when you reflect how much of it has been based on one fabric, cotton piqué. Felipe Oliveira Baptista, Lacoste's current standard-bearer, used the new collection to underscore piqué's possibilities. Double-faced or bonded, it was no longer the simple stuff of the classic polo shirt.

And no longer was it the preserve of René Lacoste's Riviera tennis courts. Baptista imagined piqué gone polar, with an iceberg print on a caban, or an ice floe pattern on a sweat suit, or a coat of latex veiling bright colors, like a sheath of ice. For men, he kept the silhouette linear and precise, the palette head-to-toe monochrome, whether it was palest celadon or intense orange. For women, the silhouette was equally defined: rounded tops; pencil skirts; narrow, cropped pants; and a handful of leather dresses with diagonal zips that sinuously defined the torso.

The image summoned up by the label Lacoste is iconic enough to border on the banal, so there was a subtle iconoclasm in Baptista's anniversary collection, never more so than in a cobalt sheath with pockets slashed like a canvas by Italian artist Lucio Fontana.