If you were looking for an antidote to the retro, rigid forties looks Milanese designers have been serving up all week, Emilio Pucci's Peter Dundas was your man tonight. As he memorably put it, "I make clothes that women want to put on and men want to take off." For muses he looked to Anita Pallenberg, Britt Ekland, and Angie Bowie, late-sixties/early-seventies rock goddesses all. Their long bangs and short skirts provided a template for Dundas; he added the signature Pucci swirl: an archive print that he rehabbed for minis paired with beaded T-shirts, tunics belted and worn as dresses, and black and white knits covered in studs. Balancing out all those micro hemlines were way-way-over-the-knee suede boots; the red ones, in particular, stilled the hearts of a few in the audience.

In keeping with his briefer-is-better mind-set, Dundas showed plenty of shorts: black leather, zebra-print ponyskin, another pair embroidered all over in jet beads. Rita Ora, whose tour Dundas costumed, was sitting in the front row in a pair of white ones. If the lack of pants was a disappointment to fans of his tailoring, he made up for it with fuzzy mohair jackets in ice-cream pastels accented with baroque black and gold buttons—color is another thing that's gone missing this season.

Over the course of the last few collections, Dundas has been inching away from Pucci's jet-set heritage, avoiding prints, and even, arguably, going downbeat. Not this season. Intentionally or not, this show seemed almost to bring him full circle. Emilio himself might've been impressed with the math skills required to create the fringed minidress with its green and lavender leopard-print pattern. More to the point, it'll be a kick to wear.