This was an especially confident outing for Tommy Hilfiger. And no wonder: Hilfiger is far from the only designer referencing hoary menswear suiting materials this season, but he is one of the few lucky ones whose house style bears a familial resemblance to the trend. Hilfiger's stock-in-trade collegiate prep may not be a sibling of classic English tailoring, but it's certainly a second or third cousin of the look. In other words, Hilfiger was on firm ground here, and his collection had all the conviviality, and virtually none of the awkwardness, of a big family reunion.

Hilfiger expressed the Savile Row theme largely through check: This collection was bursting with Prince of Wales checks and houndstooth checks and plaids, which he magnified and riffed into pieces such as abbreviated minis, double-breasted blazers, and a panoply of solid outerwear. An emphatic burgundy-toned Prince of Wales peacoat trimmed in shearling was very good; even nattier, though, were the coats in which the checks had been deployed with more restraint, such as a camel coat with houndstooth detailing and red leather trim or an overcoat with a subdued houndstooth of black and navy. Alongside the check, Hilfiger also made effective use of argyle and pinstripe. The most intriguing development in this collection, though, was its touch of futurism—leather-bonded cable knits and leather Prince of Wales jackets with a technical matte-ness added a new texture to the Tommy aesthetic. At heart, Hilfiger is a nostalgist, but this show found him giving his atavistic impulses a modern spin.