New York's Gopher Gang was the 1890s version of today's smash and grab hoodies: recidivists who steal clothes not to resell (the preferred method of today's crooks) but to retool to fit their bodies. A gang of thugs, yes, but at least a fashion-savvy one. They were a reference, alongside the antebellum era, for Todd Lynn's fashion week outing.

Lynn's opening gambit was a dove gray suit that was true to both his inspirations. Any of the characters lounging around in the mansion of Leonardo DiCaprio's evil Calvin Candie in Django Unchained would be perfect in it. The long, lean tailoring, darted in the back with sculptured shoulders, had Civil War stylings all over it. But the antebellum age quickly reverted to something else—blue and black stripe suiting from a collaboration with artist Marcus James that suddenly announced ragtag Dickensian/Carnaby Street. "That's what it's all about," said Lynn backstage. "The Gopher Gang stole clothes, cut and mixed them up, restitched them back together in a sort of helter-skelter kind of way—it is meant to look ransacked because it was."

Even ransacked looked good with Lynn's signature tailoring. More precise engineering followed, including some very good trouser suits with touches of goat fur and his trademark buttery leather (Lynn will never stray too far from his rock 'n' roll roots). A black jersey dress that doubled as a T-shirt was perhaps inspired by his old boss and front-row guest Roland Mouret, whose "TTD" (tunic top dress look) created a triple-duty garment. Then there were the cobweb lace pieces with a hidden horse motif that were imminently wearable, minus, of course, the "septum rings" that looked as painful as they sounded. The show ended with looks in box pleats with paper-bag waists—they were zany yet well constructed, and they may well turn into the Marmite of fashion: Customers will either love them or hate them. Let the buyers decide.