Christopher Raeburn's "Remades" are his raisons d'être. He seeks out far-flung vintage pieces and deadstock fabrics, and alchemizes them into something new and modern. (For the second season running, he's collaborated with the great Japanese brand Porter to do the same for bags.) This season's standouts on the Remade front were enormous, shaggy jackets and coats repurposed from the sheepskin greatcoats of Siberian army officers. God grant conditions cold enough for one of those. (In much of the U.S., God is currently obliging.) They were the highlights of a strong new collection spun around the theme of the arctic and the dwindling but defiant Inuit communities that live there. Raeburn's explorers looked ready to take on the challenge of getting to the ends of the earth. In addition to those sheepskins, they wore parkas reborn from German military sleeping bags, track pants in British Millerain, and tissue-thin nylon shells—delicately ruched and thin enough to pack fully into their own sacks—inspired by the seal-gut (as in, literally, intestines from seals) versions explorers wore earlier in the century. In this last case, thankfully, the original material wasn't sourced.

But the real achievement of the collection was how it continued to expand the Raeburn label. This season saw the addition of knitwear for the first time: sweaters with polar-bear intarsias in merino wool and heavier versions where the wool had been rubberized. It's one more link in the chain for a collection that started humbly and has, over the years, built up to a quiet stalwart. So it wasn't a surprise to find Raeburn after the show enthusing, "This is my favorite collection we've ever done."