"A whimsical play on proportions," Carolina Herrera promised before her show. The designer was thinking along rounder lines than usual. Karlie Kloss' black boiled-wool coat enveloped her like a cocoon; it was as elliptical as her pony-hair pencil skirt was straight. After that opening salvo, jacket shoulders sloped softly into bracelet-length sleeves and swung away from the back in generous volumes. With its deep sable hem, a fiery red wool gazar style in a silhouette ever so slightly evocative of Cristobal Balenciaga looked striking, as did another in bordeaux double-face wool with navy blue alligator appliqués.

In a way, you could argue that geometry was the collection's dominant refrain. In addition to those memorable rounded jackets (not to mention the somewhat regrettable fez-shaped hats), there were graphic patterns by the yard: triangles, diamonds, and parallelograms, all hand-painted, embroidered, or printed. They worked best when the cut of the garment was super-streamlined and the fabrics were straightforward, as was the case with a sleek cap-sleeve silk cady gown. Other times, the prints got in the way of textural fabrics, and when Herrera added fur trim into the mix, well, it just became too much. An ivory silk double-face gown provided an object lesson in simplifying. Adorned with nothing more than a deep mahogany velvet belt, it was the most pared-down, least eccentric thing on the runway, and far and away the loveliest.