From the private collections of friends to Manhattan's biggest institutions, Dennis Basso looked at a lot of contemporary art before designing Fall. (So much, in fact, that he didn't cite one specific artist as a point of inspiration.) Basso treated his collection like a canvas, hand-painting grand black-and-metallic brushstrokes on quite a few pieces, from a classic strapless ball gown in royal blue to a pair of narrow burgundy pants.

For Basso, it's never about trends. But he also doesn't want the collection to look old-fashioned. Sometimes, as with a long-hooded vest in lynx, the longtime furrier succeeded. Not so much with the elaborately beaded Peter Pan collars on blouses and dresses. While the girl who loves directional clothes is not wearing this stuff, it certainly has an audience. And, as usual, many of Basso's most loyal clients were sitting front row. "I want her to be able to buy it now and pull it out five years later," he said backstage before the show. One gown in particular—a black shell and floor-length tulip skirt covered in black bugle beads and white pearls—definitely fit into that category.