The mise-en-scène for Eudon Choi was a set of black-and-white photos of crazed Beatles fans projected on the venue walls, with the soundtrack blaring corresponding screaming fans and the band's tunes. The carefully set scene reflected some of the pieces in the collection, but the stars of the show were the edifyingly modern looks that hit the runway, leaving us jettisoning the past and looking firmly toward the future.

To wit, a rigorously tailored plaid jacket with statement shoulders was fairly contemporary, then Choi added fresh and sharply executed details like an oversize funnel-neck collar and lantern sleeves—but with one sleeve placed higher than the other. Choi probably doesn't even realize it, but he is something of a hero for the modern working girl. Case in point: A superb pinstriped "suit" with a longer jacket teamed with jogging trousers will hopefully sound the death knell for the standard-issue work suit. Another office standby of gray flannel suiting appeared, but in an exquisite shape. Among Choi's many strengths in this collection were the coats. Yes, the gray fur chubbies provided a bit of nostalgia, but the Prince of Wales-check capes and military coats were slavishly devoted to tailoring and hit all the right commercial notes.

At that stage, the neutral palettes seemed sufficient, but then the designer decided to add color with suede patchwork trousers and angora leggings. Yes, yes, we get that whole Pallenberg/Faithfull/Penny Lane reference, but it wasn't even necessary. Why? Because Choi's last looks killed it. A white jumpsuit in a trompe l'oeil paneling, a simple white frock with bib beading, and a fluid black dress are future collectibles. He did himself a disservice by trumpeting the past, especially the tedious sixties, which is a reference that fashion should take a break from or kill outright. In fairness, Choi is probably too modest to suggest what was patently obvious—that he heralds a bright new era in fashion.