This year, Steven Alan is celebrating his twentieth anniversary in the business. And while Alan has moved from the cotton shirts that originally put his namesake brand on the map to a full-blown collection that includes ready-to-wear, home, eyewear, and shoes, the idea is still the same. Every piece is functional, devoid of bells and whistles or clutter. It's just that, now, Alan's tag can fill up an entire closet instead of an eighth of it.

This season, the starting point was the work of realist painter Andrew Wyeth and his wife, Betsey, a frequent subject. Alan also thought about the women in his office piling on oversize sweaters and scarves in the depths of this cold New York City winter, and offered plenty of knits—many done in brushed alpaca for that lofty feeling a lot of designers have been going for this season. A men's gray sweater, for instance, was worn over a collarless shirtdress and cropped, skinny gray wool trousers. A charcoal wool midi skirt was layered under a soft sweater too, this one accented with thin gold bracelets on each wrist. (Jewelry is a new category for Alan, but like the rest of what he does, the delicate pieces complement but don't compete with the other brands he carries in his showroom and stores.) He also brought back the jumpsuit, done in a blue plaid flannel and looking as cozy as a pair of pajamas. The great thing about Steven Alan, and why he's been able to expand his retail footprint so quickly, is that his clothes feel like fashion but are accessible for those who find self-consciously cool labels pretentious. Many different women can be a Steven Alan girl, and this collection reflected that.