Let's make the disclaimer up front that "jungle" isn't much used anymore; these are "rain forest" times. But anyone familiar with Tsumori Chisato's wanderlust—she chooses a different geographic milieu each season—will probably concur that vibrant jungle flora and fauna gave the Japanese designer no shortage of source material today. Remarkably, this wasn't quite enough for Chisato, so she drew from the 1920s and 1950s for her silhouette story. And alliteration aside, Jungle Jazz Age is one heck of a harmony, if you can accept the fact that it will consist of bejeweled baboon faces, coconut pom-poms, and toucan-shaped shirt collars. Chisato pushed the mash-up texturally, too; extra-long tinsel stood in for fringes and raccoon fur gave the hirsute impression of gorilla.

Those willing to wade through additional clichés—a barrel (or at least a half dozen) of neon-sequined monkeys swinging across two slouchy tops and a black pant—might best appreciate Chisato's arty jacquards. Some were slashed with sharply defined color, others were soft like watercolor, and one blanket-style sweater had strong modernist impact. A collection like this requires extreme cherry-picking, and you can certainly rule out the restricting lantern skirts and garish patchwork leather and sequin coat. To you, the sweater with half-moon sleeves and a fierce gorilla mug is a novelty; to Chisato, it's un-boring. Semantics is everything.