"I've always wanted to reference the whirling dervishes," said designer Tia Cibani on Tuesday at her sliver of a studio in New York's Meatpacking District. For Fall, she did just that, turning to her native North Africa for more than a little inspiration.

Today, the runway at her show venue, the Prince George Ballroom—a grand ol', just-decrepit-enough place—was lined with Moroccan rugs bought just across the street. Cibani's team handed out Turkish delights as favors, and mint tea was served in the lobby. The clothes followed suit, most obviously with elongated felt fezzes made by New York milliner Joy Kim.

Each look was a study in layers and proportion. For instance, a pair of slim cupro pants—traditionally called churidar—were worn under an A-line caftan, and a cropped, chunky, hand-knit sweater was paired with an above-the-ankle ball skirt in a "Damascus rose" brocade. That same floral was rendered digitally on a long gown, which skimmed the body at the front but billowed into a cape at the back. "Collapsing volume," Cibani called it.

Iris Apfel was also a muse. "I was feeling very magpie," Cibani said. It came through in the multiple shapes and styles on offer, from a bergamot-colored coat nipped in at the waist with a leather belt to the leopard-print tunic and matching legging trouser in rusty red. Cibani managed to cast a burnished patina over the whole collection, giving each piece a sense of belonging.