The press preview for the Metropolitan Museum of Art costume exhibit Charles James: Beyond Fashion took place on Monday morning, and those who attended could certainly see the couturier's influence on Zac Posen's Fall collection when it was shown in his Tribeca studio a few hours later. "He's one of my favorite designers," Posen said of the legendary James. "This collection came down to exactly what he was about: focusing on a level of discipline and craft."

To emphasize his refreshed attention to good, clean work that shows off his abilities in draping, pleating, and overall garment construction, Posen presented just 25 looks. To start, there were seamed skirtsuits in mélange tweed. The construction was precise, although the hem of the skirts might've been taken down an inch or two for slightly more modern proportions. There were also day dresses—most notably a blue mélange tweed style with a mini cape that curved around the arms beautifully—as well as black double-face wool coats with voluminous backs that added the good kind of drama. But it was really about the gowns. The narrow, off-the-shoulder style with architectural flutter sleeves in stretchy rose-colored duchesse satin felt youthful and alive. The strapless seafoam green number, with a skirt so wide it grazed knees on both sides of the aisle, proved that extreme volume can be done without looking garish. And who could forget the slate blue gown with a high neckline? It was made for Fall party season.

Posen is a special designer: His talent was recognized and lauded early in his career, but he doesn't fit into the mold of many of his contemporaries. His collections are grounded in the silhouettes, not directional trends or ideas. He is at his best when he blocks out the noise of the outside world. "I want to be able to offer women something very special," Posen said. And with this collection, he did.