Spanish designer Miguel Adrover's Spring 2001 collection proved that he is one of the most creative and insightful talents in his field. An impeccable navy suit and cream blouse with matching navy trim set the tone for the show, providing the perfect prelude to a series of polished looks. Featuring comfortable blazers with straight-legged trousers, masculine shirts and casual polos, Adrover brought to mind a Pimm's-and-lemonade-sipping debutante enjoying the good life in Bermuda. But his archetypal woman has many faces: Interspersed among his parade of proper uptown ladies were ghetto-fabulous home girls with bandannas and cutoff shirts, Army cadets in strict olive-green uniforms and streetwise chicks in distressed jeans. Shockingly, they all blended in seamlessly, forming a chic procession of mix-and-match style tribes.

The key to Adrover's success lies in his ability to appropriate diverse cultural elements to create something utterly new. While most native New Yorkers develop early on a talent for deciphering stereotypes and social codes, Adrover knows that, sometimes, it is the foreigners who ultimately get it right.