Thirty-odd years ago, give or take a season, Stephen Burrows was the man. He starred with Jaclyn Smith in his own fragrance ad. He had a boutique at Henri Bendel. And the likes of Grace Jones, Jerry Hall, and Pat Cleveland were gallivanting around Studio 54, no doubt, in his body-hugging designs. Cleveland is still gallivanting, this time in the front row of Burrows' show at the Robert Miller Gallery. "His clothes are like butterfly wings. I feel so free," said Cleveland, who is still keeping good company. Alongside her were Valentino's Carlos de Souza, members of the band Elefant, satirist Fran Lebowitz, Lily Atherton, curator Thelma Golden, and director Jamie Johnson, providing substantial evidence that Burrows is still, after some time out of the limelight, very much a relevant fashion presence today.

For his Spring collection, Rio de Janeiro furnished the creative fodder for flirty dresses, some with keyhole necklines, wrapped or with godets in celadon, chalk white, and cerise red. Burrows has always been inspired by the way clothes move on the body, so it's no surprise that his fabric of choice is jersey. This time, his signature lettuce edging was reimagined as tendrils of seaweed, delicately cascading around necklines and down torsos. The mostly solid collection was livened up by zigzag stitches in red, as on a black minidress worn by Cameron Russell, and pastel Charlie Brown-style chevron inserts. Prints by RCA grad Ben Copperwheat of Curb Studio added spice, while crystal and bead embellishments gave the finale pieces flash.

Even before the models started their parade, it was clear that Burrows has resumed his stride. His post-seventies business was as flat as day-old Champagne (despite the inspiration his work has given a younger generation of designers, such as Marc Jacobs), but no more. All of these years later, Burrows said that he is "more open to new things and outside influences on his work." And so are we.