With this twisted and riveting collection, Stefano Pilati proved himself a fashion subversive of the first order. It was easy—he simply carried over the back-buttoning tunic he introduced for women last season into his new menswear. Back then, he talked about the sexiness of a woman needing a man to help her in and out of her top. Did something similar apply here? Next spring, will the words on the YSL man's lips be, "Do me up, darling?"

The untucked, free-flowing tunic, with its little stand-up collar, worn over slightly cropped pants, was the new collection's strongest look. It established a groovy, late sixties/early seventies Bob Evans-ish vibe that carried through to jeans printed with a pop motif, big knit tops, a suede shirt-jacket, a leather blouson with python inserts, and full leather pants paired with a gauzy top and sandals. One blouson was printed with a crowd scene from the Woodstock love-in in 1969. Pilati insisted it was his way of saying he'd rather be part of the crowd than stand out, but with accessories as exemplary as the ones he showed—not just those sandals, but also moccasins, clogs, embroidered and ethnic metal belts, and fringed-suede booties—any man would be the center of attention.

One small caveat: The final passage of eveningwear looked conventional, even slightly stiff, in comparison to everything else. After succumbing to the decadent spell cast by Pilati's designs for day, why on earth would the YSL man suddenly straighten up come nightfall?