The neon-lit concrete expanse of the Palais de Tokyo was a grimly suitable backdrop for Miharayasuhiro's urban warriors. The only designer in fashion who devotes much time to thinking about what the fourth dimension might actually look like, Mihara saw his urbanites in tailored shorts suits over bike courier's leggings, which met thick socks just below the knee. The socks were in turn tucked into a boot cut out so it looked like a gladiator sandal, or a platform Birkenstock in purple croc. Mihara's rep rests on his collaborations with Puma, so it was to be expected that the shoes would be standouts, not just the "glads" and the Birks, but also something that looked like an unholy marriage of a running shoe and a metallic Capezio. Better still was the medically inspired body jewelry created by Londoner Husam El Odeh. A plastic neckpiece, plastic ankle guards, and metallic wrist and ear pieces had an organic-cum-futuristic quality that gelled neatly with Mihara's own mix of the technical and the tribal. It hinted at something just beneath the skin, in an abstract rib-cage pattern printed on a shirt, or a jacket opened along its back seams as though something was clawing its way out.