The Jaeger London label is a snapshot of the upper level of the aspirational British high street—the middle England middlebrow, middle-aged taste of the nation. As such, it's not a designer collection but an update on commercial perennials: this season, a seventies hippie-slash-safari, ethnic-y print vibe made sensible for a woman who works and attends dinner parties. (Surprise point here: After a year of freaking out most normal women, the harem pant is now safe for the mainstream.) Otherwise, Jaeger's patchworked, piped tailoring picked up a distinct hint of Proenza Schouler, and the flower-sprigged voile dresses something of a Celia Birtwell feel.

It was fine, but the very presence of such a collection on the official London schedule will be under scrutiny next season, when the city's show dates will be truncated from six days to four. Most high-street stores (other than Topshop) present their wares after the show cycle, and that's perhaps where Jaeger ought to fit. In any case, it's a position the label's owner, Harold Tillman, will have to think about particularly long and hard. His other job is chairman of the British Fashion Council, the man charged with protecting the interests of the young designers who will be competing for dwindling show time next February.