The goal, Simon Spurr said in his studio a few days before his runway presentation, was "a reinforcement of my British aesthetic. Quadrophenia done in a luxurious way." That may have been his inspiration, but the results veered more toward luxury than the Who—not that there's anything wrong with that. The Simon Spurr man is an unapologetic luxe-o-phile, and Spurr's suits are exquisitely—and expensively—made. (Not for nothing did he serve a term as design director of Ralph Lauren Purple Label, although he noted that he's splitting his own line into the higher-end Simon Spurr and the more contemporary Spurr collections.)

This season there was a safari thread woven throughout, borrowed from seventies YSL. Sandy trenches and sparrow-tail parkas were strong, as were khaki suiting and suede camp shirts (not designed for the rainforest trek, one guesses). For the dandy back in the metropole, there was plaid and windowpane suiting with bold raspberry tones, and a baby pink pair of jeans—the second pair of men's jeans in that shade to hit the runway this fashion week, in fact. At its inception, the designer focused his line on ultra-premium jeans, and there were well-cut, masculine pairs here, shown with precisely tailored blazers, a smart concession to the way that even Masters of the Universe are beginning to dress. But modern Thomas Crowns—as Spurr thinks of his clientele—know that there are occasions when one can't be casual. For those, there was full-on formalwear in texturized, engineered jacquard.