"Not everyone wants to wear leather, tulle, and knit," said Graeme Armour, explaining the much lighter turn he took for Spring. That sounds like a line straight from a retailer's mouth, and Armour is wisely heeding a buyer's perspective as he focuses the energies of his young label on sales.

That's not to say that this three-year Alexander McQueen alum wasn't also focused on ideas in his second New York collection, which, he explained, took its cues from sixties Balenciaga and Courrèges. Armour has long been fascinated by clothes that are a sort of facade, different from front to back, and he explored that theme here. The notion of a butcher's apron was turned into a dress that looked like a midi-length sixties shift coming but revealed a short black skirt and crisscross halter going.

That's the piece for a photo shoot, but in terms of those coveted sales, the front-back concept found more success in a pair of black satin shorts. They appeared plain from the back but in front were covered with flat razored ruffles, helping them pass as a skirt. The proceedings weren't entirely leather-free. Armour's take on motorcycle chic—a cropped suede jacket and a black leather skirt, both paired with crisp white shirts—immediately drew the eye. It would have the same effect on a retailer's rack. Expect to see this designer popping up there by and by.