"I never do inspiration boards," Rad Hourani said backstage. "The inspiration is always the same—the inspiration is what I feel like wearing."

What Hourani feels like wearing is, almost without exception, skintight leggings in leather and PVC; modified blousons with giant, undulating lapels; and long, layering tees. He likes them in black and white. And he likes them the same for himself and for the ladies: Hourani is one of the standard-bearers of unisex dressing. He sent out boys and girls dressed identically or complementarily, and the lads and lasses were styled just the same—right down to the same makeup and chunky, peep-toe stacked heels. (They're from Aldo, believe it or not—now there's a designer collaboration we didn't see coming.) Marching down the runway in lockstep, the boy-girl model pairs looked a bit like replicants making their way onto a new Noah's ark.

Hourani's aesthetic is indebted to the apocalyptic fantasies of Rick Owens and the stringency of Helmut Lang, and he borrows from both. There's a luxuriousness to his fabrications that's enticing, and something undeniably compelling about his unwavering devotion to his own vision. But that makes it nearly impossible to judge except on its own terms. If you liked Rad Hourani before, you'll probably like him now.