Before her show, Sophie Théallet reeled off a host of Mexican references: Luis Barragán's colorful, minimalist architecture; Tina Modotti photos; Frida Kahlo; and Chavela Vargas, a singer introduced to her by Pedro Almodóvar and Rossy de Palma. A moment later, she rescinded them almost entirely. "But it's not about Mexico," she said. "It's just chic and polished with nonchalance—what I like to give to a woman."

Still, the Latin American nation left a ghostly trace on Théallet's beautiful and infinitely wearable collection. There were peasant blouses and skirts with a single tightly controlled tier of pleats, and liberal use of traditional lace, culminating couture-style in the final look of a bride. Models were styled with a Kahlo-esque chignon and crimson lips. But Théallet considers her collection a slow-boiling evolution immune to trends. Here, bohemian printed sundresses, and variations on a breezy, loose silhouette that gently gathered at the waist, followed right in line with what she's been doing confidently since day one.