Tze Goh is something of an anomaly among the young London designers. In a city where people tend to make their fashion reputation with a bang, this Central Saint Martins grad has a habit for quietness. The mood of Goh's latest collection, his fourth, is one of Zen-like contemplativeness. Mainly what he's been contemplating is construction and ways of using fine detail in the make of his clothes to feminize and sculpture-ize traditional menswear pieces. The resulting clothes are so clean and so minimal, they threaten not to make an impression. But they do reward scrutiny.

Goh has developed an interesting signature in dense, bonded materials—his use of them gives even a casual garment like a piqué polo a substantiality as well as a quality of aloofness. Elsewhere, the gazar in the collars of his crisp white button-down and shirtdress makes for a nice, sharpening detail; ditto the waist-less cut of his mannish shorts and trousers. And Goh's collarless jackets and A-line shifts are so well made, it seems churlish to point out that they're a little boring. It takes a lot of confidence for a young designer to risk boredom in pursuit of subtlety; Goh is to be congratulated on his nerve. But his previous collections have shown a bit more flair in terms of color and silhouette; they were quiet yet forceful. At any rate, Goh is one to watch.