N.Hoolywood's Daisuke Obana picks a theme and commits. When it works, it works. In the past, he's managed to spin a kind of runway poetry out of Scottish mountaineers and salt-crusted seafarers. It's a fine line between styling and costuming, but he's been unusually agile about negotiating the divide. On the runway, his epics are totally believable; in stores, the clothes are, too, even for those of us not ready to trade urban life for the fishing boat.

But because one of his themes doesn't necessarily predict another, it's possible to love Hoolywood one season and be left cold by the next. Obana called his new collection Vandalegal, inspired by graffiti writers. He clearly has a connoisseur's appreciation for the form, and maybe even a fan's wishful envy of its practitioners (he closed the show by literally signing it in spray paint). His gang of writers and bombers—an epic 41 of them, street-cast as usual—made a convincing crew. But accuracy, even of the minutely observed kind that Obana delivers, doesn't always spark desire. There was plenty of perfectly credible street wear here, from oversize plaid shirts (with matching face scarves) and sweats to bombers and spray-drip sweaters. Wearable all; Obana has gotten the store side of the equation right again. But much of what was shown lacked the charge that his weirder and more electric conjurings often carry. Or maybe it's just that each new foray courts a different crowd. A few cap brims were inscribed with "the faith of graffiti": This show was only for the true believers.