Convention would dictate that the riots that rocked London last year were an expression of inchoate rage. Or you could spin them as some chilling new kind of high-stakes gladiatorial urban game. The rioters themselves sure seemed to be having fun. It was that kind of manifesto-free anarchy that the Sibling threesome—Sid Bryan, Joe Bates, and Cozette McCreery—drew on for their first runway show, a fast, furious presentation they called Revolution. Though their collection couldn't exactly make worlds turn, it still had the boulverse feel of an assault on orthodoxy. But the Siblings are sly devils. The soundtrack was one clue: Rather than the raw call-to-arms of the Clash, it was the pantomime punk of Sham 69 that underscored the marchpast of high-performance urban sportsgear. In other words, let's play at revolt. Hence, the oh-so-trad toile de jouy that, on closer examination, depicted the wrack of the riots; the running shorts under leggings; the laurel wreath of skull and crossbones, proclaiming that the victors' spoils were naught. It's impossible to ignore the fact that Europe is submerging itself once more in the Euro Cup championship as a distraction from grisly economic woes. But the Siblings brought in football references from farther West. Gridiron shoulders were rendered in white paillettes and hoodies, and cropped sweats showed up in in lurex. It's not the first time Sibling has repurposed edginess—Sid Bryan was wearing the label' s classic knit biker jacket from 2008 at the show today—but this particular manifestation looked like an exercise in exquisite let-them-eat-cake (right-after-they've-nicked-it) decadence. The shownotes mentioned Kehinde Wiley, the African-American artist who poses his models against lavishly Rococo backdrops. The same kind of rarefied self-consciousness infiltrated the Sibling collection, and it felt like a thrill.