The grave young bohemians parading up and down the Clements Ribeiro catwalk today were curious creatures. Who were they, with their detached nonchalance? Where were they going garbed in their retro eccentricity and their flat plastic sandals? Anyone who saw Wes Anderson's Moonrise Kingdom had a head start on the answers to those questions, because they'll already know about Suzy Bishop's idiosyncratic style, as well as her affection for French chantoozie Françoise Hardy, whose plangent tones soundtracked the show. But people who weren't as familiar—or as taken—with Suzy's tween precocity as Suzanne Clements and Inacio Ribeiro might have been less willing to surrender to a collection whose spirit veered toward groovy Provençal schoolmarm (Suzy's teacher, in other words).

In a low-key, somewhat flat presentation, the designers used Suzy as a bridge back to their own archive: a checked skirt with a striped cashmere sweater, a quirky detail like a fluoro orange belt on a shirtdress, the contrast of a black moiré skirt and a top trimmed in turquoise lace…the off-ness of such looks was quintessential Clements Ribeiro. In a perverse way, these were clothes for connoisseurs, because it required a particular kind of mind-set to appreciate the long, sheer black or white dresses covered with huge paillettes, or the black dress embroidered with red carnations and layered over a skirt trimmed in bobbles and more of those paillettes. (Everything always with those plastic sandals.) Schoolmarm? Perhaps. But also artist's wife. Or anything where a love of craft is attached to a devil-may-care attitude.