For her last collection at Diesel Black Gold, Sophia Kokosalaki looked back to her first years in fashion, as a student at Central Saint Martins in London in the nineties. "We were always waiting to see what Melanie Ward or Corinne Day was going to do in the next issue of The Face," the designer said before the show, explaining how a nineties aesthetic made its way into this season's clothes. As the ramp at the head of the runway and the four male skaters who opened the show made clear, skateboard culture also had an influence. Kokosalaki developed this season's print from pictures she snapped of an ever-evolving graffiti wall in a skate park near the Thames. Jeans came wrapped with shiny black tape at the ankles—the way skaters wear them—and the seams on leather jackets were actually bonded shut, as opposed to sewn, also with tape. Embossed leather miniskirts that wrapped closed were a little punk rock, but they had the classic simplicity Kokosalaki was going for. Most of the embellishment came from swinging fringe on high-heel sandals or long, low-slung belts made from techy, braided rope. It was a succinct definition of this brand's identity: Athletic and urban street wear with a clean, pared-down appeal. Kokosalaki's successor, Andreas Melbostad, the former Phi designer, is now charged with overseeing the next stage of Black Gold's evolution.