Sally LaPointe started Spring's design process by photographing natural things—rock formations, marble, and quarries—but hit the inspiration jackpot when she came across pictures of an abandoned and once secret underground submarine base in Balaklava. "It captured the mood I wanted," the designer said backstage before her show, describing how the image of a river running through the massive concrete structure struck the hard/soft, man/nature dichotomy she wanted to explore. There was an organic element to the shapes of the clothes, especially in the rounded, side-pleated, high-waisted shorts that pulled off the dual feat of revealing maximum leg and looking elegant; they even looked like viable eveningwear in a rich, dark green satin with a leather inset. If those were on the curvy end of the curvilinear spectrum, exaggerated lambskin peplum tops with strong cutouts were architecturally linear—more man than nature.

Throughout, LaPointe struck the balance between the two that she was looking for. The tailoring on fitted dresses and linen jackets was sharp, but a simple jumpsuit cut low in a deep V was nicely unstructured. The collection's fluid simplicity made a few lace-embellished pieces look busy, but a sense of restraint—and the promising presence of Bergdorf's Linda Fargo in the front row—means most of these pieces are primed to be worn.