The trouble with so many designers in New York's rising class is their insistence on producing entire collections of performance pieces: Red-carpet frocks and editorial looks that will turn on the stylists in the house and clothes too stiff to sit down in, but not the kind of stuff a girl can wear day in and day out. Lucky for us, Tess Giberson doesn't have that problem.

Giberson titled her Spring show "Reassembled" and devoted her energies to, she said, "the silhouette, taking it apart and putting it back together to create something new." But for all the deconstruction in the clothes, they were the kinds of things we all reach for: an easy slipdress collaged together from different weights and textures of silk, an unstructured blazer with a cutaway hem in back, a special T-shirt embroidered in front with swirls of crochet and worn with skinny pants. OK, the trailing lengths of fabric on asymmetrically wrapped dresses could prove dangerous on the subway—stand clear of those closing doors—but otherwise the show was as real-world cool as the runways get.