Timo Weiland and Alan Eckstein deejayed the opening of the Brooklyn Museum's Keith Haring exhibition in March, the occasion of which marked the beginning of Haring fever in their studio. The documentary The Universe of Keith Haring sparked a fascination with Haring's role in New York's eighties hip-hop scene, and—voilà!—a collection was born.

The designers worked their way up to full-on pairings of Haring-style graphics, starting first with crisp black and white looks. The hip-hop influence was evident in the menswear, which had a relaxed silhouette with a hint of the basketball court to it. Track pants, color-blocked shorts, and dense knit hoodies were all solidly wearable.

Womenswear got the full graffiti treatment. Blown-up herringbone and houndstooth prints in acid yellow were combined with neon zigzags. A mixed-print halter dress with a trapeze skirt looked youthful and spunky; brocade pants in yellow herringbone were solid white on the back, giving the print even more impact and expanding the ways in which the pants could be worn. That same herringbone picked out in matte Swarovski crystals on a taupe pencil skirt looked dense and rich, a nice antidote to the runway's colorful—and fun—visual noise. At 42 looks, the show was overly long and, with several similar silhouettes, didn't offer enough variation to justify so many exits. Part of this is a result of showing menswear and womenswear together, but, in designing and staging, Weiland and Eckstein would be smart to do more with less.