It's funny the way subculture operates in fashion. Once upon a time, punks, rude boys, and ravers were distinct tribes, separated not only by attitude and taste, but also by time. But lo and behold, there they were all together in the new McQ menswear collection, a veritable convention of the musically inclined and anti-mainstream. The McQ folks were artful in their mishmashing—the object here, it seemed, was to conjure brashness, either by emphasizing acid-house colors and trippy graphics, and/or by making the clothes look messed-up and tattered. There were some very cool messed-up effects here: A pair of narrow, bright orange jeans, for instance, were made to look crumpled, as though they'd recently been lying scrunched up on the bedroom floor, while the McQ tartans were all patchworked together and trailing threads at the seams. None of this was overbearing. The loud black-and-white graphics, meanwhile, were very overbearing, and that was very much the point.

But the clothes stopped just short of feeling aggressive; they were too dandyish for that. McQ's angry young men looked quite natty in their pleated trousers, tapered just so. And their raver brethren came off even more precise, with their trim graphic jacquards and brazenly colored bomber jackets. The references may have been all over the shop, but the fine-tuning was utterly consistent. This was a collection tailor-made—literally, almost—for the age of the Spotify mix and Genius playlist.